The Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Malamutes ("Mals") are highly intelligent, physically strong, and can be so animated while expressing themselves and/or making demands. Mals were bred to hunt, pull sleds, live with their family, and protect their home. While they are typically not good watchdogs, some are known to guard their family and home. A Mals relationship with humans is built on trust. Some are friendlier and some prefer their family over strangers. Each is a unique individual influenced by genetics, socialization, health, and experiences. 

This stoic working breed requires mental stimulation, routine, enrichment, nap time, and exercise. When bored or stressed, they are known to dig, chew, or destroy a sofa or bed for fun! Mals also have a natural predatory desire to chase critters, cats, deer, and see small dogs as prey. Many are known to be reactive with other dogs most likely due to fear, lack of confidence, and/or lack of proper socialization. Malamute puppies may experience growing pains and become sensitive to touch.  Sometimes their raging hormones need mental enrichment or chewing to release their stress. A potty-trained Malamute may have accidents inside the house due to stress. It is so important to "listen" and observe their behavior.

Positive reinforcement (R+) rewards-based training works the best for Mals because they are given a choice to collaborate with you and are rewarded. Make them an offer their taste buds cannot refuse and you will have their attention! We have used R+ to teach Mals not to chase squirrels, deer, etc. It takes time to change natural behavior but it can be done! Training builds confidence and a strong bond with their human. If you choose to adopt from CHAAMP we require an R+ training commitment.

 

Rescues have been let down enough by humans, let's learn together and make their world a better place!

 

Please do your research on Alaskan Malamutes before submitting an application:


https://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/alaskan-malamute#/slide/1

https://showdogprepschool.com/positive-reinforcement-training-does-it-work-for-the-working-group/

The greatest challenge is to look past their incredibly fluffy adorable face and pause to read their body language. Are they excited, stressed, or both? Either way, they look so darn cute! Unfortunately, when we ignore their ears pulled back, head looking away, tail down, dilated whale eye, freeze, lip lick, or nervous zoomies we set them up for failure. While dogs, in general, are quite forgiving, Malamutes are known to escalate their feelings by expressing themselves with a growl, air snap, or worse a bite. Generally speaking, Malamutes DO NOT appreciate being grabbed by their collar, physically restrained (hugged), or patted on their head. 

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